Diving into water safety

Published 5:00am 15 December 2023

Diving into water safety
Words by Nadia Chapman

As the weather gets warmer, our Redcliffe beaches become extra enticing, but it’s crucial to remain vigilant around water this summer.

Redcliffe Peninsula Surf Life Saving Club volunteers patrol the 2.5km coastline from Suttons Beach to Scotts Point from the first weekend of the September school holidays to the May long weekend.

Redcliffe Peninsula Surf Life Saving Club President Kylie Robins says it’s essential to assess the water before swimming.

“We are lucky to live in a region with such lovely waterfront public spaces, but it’s important to have a look for any dangers before swimming,” Kylie says.

“Are there exposed rocks? Is the water shallow? Is the water clear or murky? Are there any rips or strong currents? Being aware of the risks is the first step to avoiding the risk.

“Always swim at patrolled beaches and only between the red and yellow flags and observe the safety signs. If you’re unsure about the conditions, ask a lifesaver before entering the water.”

Volunteer lifesavers are on duty from noon to 5pm on Saturdays and 8am-5pm on Sundays.

“When the beach is patrolled, we will always have the safety board up noting the water temperature, tide times and any hazards for that day,” Kylie says.

“It is a wonderful source of information and something beachgoers should check out before hitting the water.”

While strong currents, rips and murky water can pose a risk, swimmers should also look out for additional aquatic hazards.

Some of the biggest risks at Suttons Beach include exposed rocks, blue bottles and stingrays.

“The exposed rocks down near the clubhouse and in front of Scotts Point are sharp and have a range of interesting and sometimes dangerous creatures living there,” Kylie says.

In a potential water emergency, Kylie says it’s important to stay calm and raise your hand.

“If you are in trouble in the water, raise your hand. You can’t always be heard shouting from shore, but an arm in the air is an easy distress signal for our lifesavers to see and respond to,” Kylie explains.

If the beach is not patrolled and you or someone else is in danger, phone 000 immediately.

Stay up to date with the club on Facebook or visit the website

REMEMBER THE F-L-A-G-S AND STAY SAFE!

F - FIND THE FLAGS

L - LOOK AT THE SAFETY SIGNS

A - ASK A LIFEGUARD FOR SAFETY ADVICE

G - GO SWIMMING WITH A FRIEND

S - STICK YOUR HAND UP FOR HELP

See the photos below (click through)

Photos by Dominika Lis

Share

Related Stories

Popular Stories

Dolphins battered in Battle for Brisbane
News / Sport

Dolphins battered in Battle for Brisbane

An already depleted Dolphins side is likely to be without Hamiso Tabuai-Fidow for a few weeks after he suffered a hamstring injury in tonight’s Battle for Brisbane. Head Coach Wayne Bennett says to ‘trust me, we’ll deal with it’ as the squad prepares for a trip to Darwin next week

Supernode to be built in Brendale
News / Local

Supernode to be built in Brendale

Work will start soon in Brendale on one of Queensland’s biggest Battery Energy Storage Systems (BESS). ** FREE TO READ **

Fishing tips: What's biting in April 2024
News / Local

Fishing tips: What's biting in April 2024

April heralds the start of the change of seasons and it is a great time for mixed bags in the local area. Water temperature will start to drop, day length is becoming shorter, and the wind generally shifts more to the southwest in the mornings. Here's some fishing tips from our expert